Drive & Survive behind the latest Ford fleet offering

Market leader Ford is the first vehicle manufacturer to offer its fleet customers an own-branded driver risk management product, which consists of online risk assessments, online E-Learning modules and on-road practical driver coaching, for a fixed fee per head

Fleet customers, even those with multi marque fleets, will be able to take advantage of the subsidised rate of £109 per driver, which will be constant irrespective of what interventions are dictated by the online assessments that each driver would initially complete.

All elements of the risk management programme, which is very similar to the ‘DRM Package’ highlighted on the Products/Hands On Training page of this website, will be provided by Drive & Survive. Even the dedicated website that drivers will log onto to complete the online aspects of the programme has been built for Ford by the Drive & Survive in-house team.

Any corporate entity with a fleet in excess of 50 vehicles, at least one of which is a Ford product, wishing to take advantage of the Ford offer should contact Drive & Survive project manager Emily Nafzger.

Non Ford fleets comprising less than fifty vehicles can also take advantage of this truly integrated driver risk management programme but on different terms and conditions – please contact sales support on enquiries@drivesurvive.co.uk

Drive & Survive wins Business Car Risk Management Award

Drive & Survive aims to position itself as an expertise resource, working alongside customers to help manage their business more effectively. It recognises the commercial realities of everyday life – although it obviously assists with duty of care compliance, and knows that the biggest influencer in the decision to implement a driver risk management programme will invariably be the effect it can have on fleet running cost savings.

All the awards are voted for by the readers of BusinessCar magazine, website and email newsletters, so it’s the people that are using the products on a daily basis who make the decisions.

BusinessCar Editor-in-Chief Tristan Young said: “Risk management is an increasingly important topic for business car managers and it’s clear that Drive & Survive is delivering the goods. Any well-managed fleet will be aware of the need to take every step to protect their drivers and the votes from BusinessCar readers show that Drive & Survive is giving the industry what it needs.”

Accepting the award on Drive & Survive’s behalf was Sales Manager, Ryan Brittain, who commented: “Selling safety has never been an easy task but we know, beyond any doubt, that what we do works in every area it touches and to be recognised (again) by our clients in this way really does make the efforts worthwhile. Thank you!”

Fleet managers told “no room for complacency” as road death toll drops

Driving deaths down below 3000 is a major success for road safety policy in Britain says the IAM (Institute of Advanced Motorists). Deaths have never been this low since national recording began in 1926. Back then there were only 1.7 million vehicles on the road, now there are over 33 million.

Seb Goldin, Managing Director of IAM Fleet and Drive & Survive, said: “There is no place for complacency from fleet managers. But national targets and the concentration on the simple message of the three ‘E’s of Education, Enforcement and Engineering have delivered safer roads than ever before.”

The Department for Transport (DfT) report ‘Road Casualties in Great Britain 2007,’ revealed today the number of people killed in road accidents fell by seven per cent from 3,172 in 2006 to 2,943 in 2007. The number of children killed fell by 20 per cent to 121.

Mr Goldin added: “The challenge now is to drive down these figures even further by targeting known high risks such as rural single carriageways, young drivers and particularly those who drive for work. Further reductions in deaths on the road will not come cheap and government must allocate more funding to road engineering schemes and actively encourage drivers to treat driving as a skill for life.”

Fire fleet wins IAM accreditation

Nottinghamshire Fire and Rescue Service has become the first fire fleet in the country to earn national accreditation from, the IAM (Institute of Advanced Motorists), for its ‘blue light’ fleet driver training programme.

The UK’s leading road safety charity and fleet training expert recognised the scheme for its focus on raising the driving standards of their fire-fighters and officers when driving to emergencies in a fire engine or an officer’s car.

Seb Goldin, Managing Director of IAM Fleet said: “Nottinghamshire is the first fire and rescue service in the country to be awarded this accreditation and has set a standard which I hope other similar organisations will wish to follow. It would be excellent if IAM were to be regarded as the national standard for driver training in the fire service, giving the public greater confidence in their emergency services.”
The Nottingham fire and rescue fleet consists of 109 operational vehicles including fire engines, support vehicles, and 4×4 and crew cab vehicles.

Emergency Fire Appliance Driver (EFAD) training for Nottinghamshire fire-fighters used to be a four day course. It has now been extended to encompass 10 days of training in Roadcraft, legislation and legal exemptions, vehicle characteristics, eco driving and skid prevention and control theory. IAM has assessed the scope and level of training in the fleet against its own criteria, and given its endorsement to the course.

The Emergency Light Vehicle Driving (ELVD) course for officers responding to emergencies in cars has also been subject to similar assessment by IAM Fleet and awarded the same accreditation.

The focus for Nottinghamshire Fire and Rescue Service (NFRS) was improving the quality of driver training, but there are other benefits as well. Students who do particularly well during training will be invited to become personal members of the IAM, and will be exempt from the standard IAM Advanced Driving Test. NFRS has seen its insurance premium cut by about £100,000 per year, partly thanks to its new and more comprehensive training programme.

Adrian Garner, Driver Training Manager at NFRS, led the project, and is delighted with the result of four years’ work. “A lot of people have put a huge amount of effort into redesigning our training course and I am confident that our drivers will be trained to a very high standard, whether they are driving a fire engine or an officer’s car.

“This is important for their own safety, for the safety of colleagues travelling with them, and for members of the public who may encounter them on the roads when responding to an emergency.”

Nottinghamshire’s success has already excited interest from fire and rescue services in other parts of the country, keen to find out how the courses were developed.

Andy Beale, Assistant Chief Fire Officer at NFRS, has been a member of the IAM for nearly 20 years. “This is a great achievement for us,” he said. “Nottinghamshire Fire and Rescue Service is constantly looking for ways to improve the quality of its training, and accreditation from a respected organisation such as IAM Fleet gives valuable credibility to what has been achieved.

“We are pleased to be seen as leading the way in this area, and I know that other fire and rescue services are already interested in learning from us. We look forward to being able to share our experiences with other organisations so that, collectively, we can raise the standard of emergency driving.”

For more information about the IAM’s Advanced Driving courses, please visit www.iam.org.uk.

Drive & Survive joins with insurance broker to drive costs and risk down

Alarmed by the statistic that one in every three road deaths on UK roads last year was linked to someone at work, the UK’s leading occupational driver training business, Drive & Survive, has joined with the LFC Insurance Group to provide online driver coaching and development for the insurance broker’s fleet clients within their insurance premiums.

The professional training division of the IAM (Institute of Advanced Motorists), Drive & Survive lead more than 35,000 drivers through risk management (DRM) programmes each year. The DRM programme determines a driver’s ‘risk rating’ through an online assessment, which then establishes what further training is required, from e-learning to on-road training.

The LFC Armada Plus product is a unique concept that will improve the performance of motor fleets, help commercial clients by reducing associated costs, and provide an audit trail for duty of care and health and safety issues for drivers at work.

The need for companies to fulfil their duty of care as an employer and to ensure that each driver is trained with the necessary skills to complete their job in the safest means possible is an ongoing necessity, even in the current economic climate.

LFC Armada Plus was created to assist companies with fleets to ensure they are maintaining this need by funding the driver assessment and online training elements of such a programme for fleet clients. The practical side of managing the programme is also carried out by Drive & Survive through tailored on-road coaching at the client’s expense.

“Through partnerships with commercial insurance brokers like LFC Insurance, and supported by forward-thinking underwriters, Drive & Survive can provide risk management solutions to fleets included within their insurance premiums, which can help to both reduce fleet costs and fulfil duty of care obligations of employers in this challenging economic climate,” said Drive & Survive Managing Director, Seb Goldin.

“Through assessing risk and up-skilling as necessary, driver training is proven to be self-funding with the benefits also likely to flow through to an improved claims experience.

“With the insurance industry covering costs to help commercial companies provide this essential form of training, this innovative partnership can further help to reduce the alarming rate of at-work driving deaths, create a safer road environment for all road users and support companies with their duty of care as fleet operators.

“Drive & Survive is delighted to partner with the independent commercial broking group, the LFC Insurance Group, to roll out the innovative new LFC Armada Plus concept,” said Mr Goldin.

LFC Insurance Managing Director Jerry Clayton said, “By working in partnership with seven leading insurers, and Drive & Survive, we are confident that we have demonstrated our commitment to the effective risk management of motor fleets, by putting our money where our mouth is.”

 

IAM Fleet appoints new Head of Training

IAM Fleet, the commercial driver training arm of the IAM (Institute of Advanced Motorists) has appointed Simon Elstow as Head of Training for its UK operations of IAM Fleet and Drive & Survive.

IAM Fleet has made the appointment as part of its commitment to provide the best advanced driver training for fleets of all sizes in the UK and overseas. The move follows the retirement of Lloyd Brown.

By promoting CPD (continuous professional development) and creating a greater awareness of road safety standards, IAM Fleet works with organisations to reduce the costs associated with occupational driving incidents and safeguard the welfare of employees who drive as part of their work activity.

An Approved Driving Instructor (ADI) and Fleet Training specialist, Mr Elstow has been involved with the IAM’s occupational training division for three years, and now ensures the standards of IAM Fleet’s national network of more than 200 highly qualified trainers are maintained at industry-best.

“Ever increasing corporate manslaughter legislation means that any member of staff driving or riding for business needs to have their safety assessed and addressed where necessary,” said Mr Elstow.

“By assisting employers and fleet managers in developing a corporate road safety culture, and designing and implementing a strategy to reduce road risk, we help them fulfil their duty of care to their employees whose work activities include driving.”

Mr Elstow said all IAM Fleet trainers are not only ADIs, they also hold an advanced driver qualification for the category of vehicle in which they provide training.

For the first time, the Head of Training post will work across the IAM Fleet Group in the UK, including Drive & Survive.

Welcoming Simon to his new role, IAM Fleet Managing Director Seb Goldin said:
“Quality driving expertise may seem like an overhead to some businesses. But the benefits in terms of saving expenses quickly pay back in fuel savings and crucially preventing the crashes that blight lives.”

NOTES TO EDITORS

1.Issued by the IAM Press Office. We have an ISDN line for interviews.

2. The IAM (Institute of Advanced Motorists) directly influences the driving and riding of more than 160,000 road users a year (full members, associates and commercial clients) in the UK and Ireland. Established in 1956, the IAM is today best known for the advanced driving test and the advanced driving course. The IAM has grown to become the UK’s leading road safety charity, dedicated to raising driving standards, engaging with the road-using public and influencing road safety policy. IAM Fleet, the corporate arm of the IAM, has two subsidiary companies, Drive & Survive and Fleet Ireland.

3. A 2006 report by Brunel University, following an 18 month study, concluded that “advanced driver training produces safer drivers and lower accident involvement”, with measurable improvements in knowledge, skills and attitude. The “Driving Tips” provided by the IAM are part of our broader road safety mission and not intended as a substitute for the advanced driving course.

4. In January 2007, the IAM Motoring Trust was established as the research and advocacy arm of the IAM. The IAM Motoring Trust will undertake research, promote practical policies, act as an advocate for safer roads, safer drivers and safer vehicles and encourage responsible motoring through education and training.

Kids and cars: Your holiday survival guide

The summer holidays have begun and families will soon be setting off to enjoy a week’s UK holiday break. But before the camping, theme parks and beach picnics can begin you need to get in the car and travel for hours to get there.

That’s when the real fun starts; the kids wiggling out of their seatbelts, bickering and asking “Are we there yet?”

But the journey doesn’t have to be so stressful. Drive & Survive has put together a few tips to help you when travelling on holiday with small children in the car.

Keep them occupied: Bored children tend to make more noise, distracting the driver. Take with you some things to occupy the children such as pencils or books – and electronic games are great if the volume is muted! Petrol stations often supply children’s activity packs for free so when you’re filling up ask if they have any available. Have some easy to play games ready – who’s the first to spot a yellow car?

Breaks: The Department for Transport recommends that drivers take a break every two hours; anything longer and children could become restless.

Strap them in: Children will need to be restrained in a suitable child restraint. More information about child restraints can be found on www.dft.gov.uk.

Safety child door locks: When driving down the motorway, the last thing you need is for your passenger door to fly open. Check your child locks prior to setting off.

Temperatures: Heat in cars can reach incredibly high levels and children have died from heat stroke in hot cars. Try to ensure the kids are kept cool. This will also prevent them from becoming restless and unhappy.

NOTES TO EDITORS

1. Issued by the IAM Press Office. We have an ISDN line for interviews.

2. The IAM (Institute of Advanced Motorists) directly influences the driving and riding of more than 160,000 road users a year (full members, associates and commercial clients) in the UK and Ireland. Established in 1956, the IAM is today best known for the advanced driving test and the advanced driving course. The IAM has grown to become the UK’s leading road safety charity, dedicated to raising driving standards, engaging with the road-using public and influencing road safety policy. IAM Fleet, the corporate arm of the IAM, has two subsidiary companies, Drive & Survive and Fleet Ireland. It also operates IAM Pro-Drive.

3. A 2006 report by Brunel University, following an 18 month study, concluded that “advanced driver training produces safer drivers and lower accident involvement”, with measurable improvements in knowledge, skills and attitude. The “Driving Tips” provided by the IAM are part of our broader road safety mission and not intended as a substitute for the advanced driving course.

4. In January 2007, the IAM Motoring Trust was established as the research and advocacy arm of the IAM. The IAM Motoring Trust will undertake research, promote practical policies, act as an advocate for safer roads, safer drivers and safer vehicles and encourage responsible motoring through education and training.

Reverse your fuel bills

p>Did you know you can save up to £2 of fuel per week by simply reversing your car into a parking space, so you drive away forwards? As well as positioning your vehicle into a safer position to pull away, there are many benefits to both your vehicle, and your pocket.

New data shows it takes an average five year old car a minute and a half for the engine to warm up and the most efficient way to warm it up is by driving it. Reversing out of a space when the car’s engine is cold uses around 20 to 25 times more petrol in the first few seconds than it does when warm. If you do this 10 to 12 times a week that adds up to a cost of about £100 a year, not to mention the increased wear on the car’s engine.

Reverse parking is also usually safer and is advised in The Highway Code. Reversing into somewhere you can see (a parking bay) rather than reversing out into somewhere you can’t see (often a line of moving traffic) is much safer. It is also easier to control a car going forwards than backwards when it is first started, and attempting a potentially high risk manoeuvre such as reversing when you have just entered a car and are not concentrating fully, is more dangerous.

From a security point of view, reversing close to an object such as a wall can make it more difficult for thieves to gain access and, if you need to leave a parking space quickly for personal security reasons, driving forward provides you with better acceleration and improved vision.

Many drivers find it helpful to lower the left (nearside) mirror to provide a guide to your lateral position. Another option, where all the parking spaces run in parallel rows, is to line your car up with the space in front and reverse back in a straight line. This should automatically position you in the centre of the space – but do remember to look where you are going!

 

Sleeping truck driver kills four

German truck driver Andreas Klassen has been jailed for five years for crashing into the back of a queue of slow moving vehicles on the M6 in Staffordshire as a result of dozing off at the wheel. The resulting four deaths, ensuing mayhem and damage to his company’s reputation was caused as a result of not complying with statutory rest periods.

Two more employers convicted for driving-related health and safety lapses

The Health & Safety Executive has brought a successful prosecution against a director of a Widnes-based firm, whose poor policies and procedures led to the death of an employee after he was run over by a vehicle on a demolition site. Commenting on the resulting suspended custodial sentence, Health & Safety Executive inspector Debbie John said, “A small investment in time and good working practices can often save a business a lot of time and money, incurred as a result of injured workers or enforcement action.”

Another company was recently fined £100,000, after one of its workers was crushed to death by the specialised vehicle he was driving when it toppled over. Lack of driver training was cited as a significant factor in this case. HSE inspector Rosemary Leese Weller said, “This employee’s death would have been entirely preventable if simple health and safety precautions had been followed, including proper vehicle maintenance and training. This particular accident illustrates the importance of employers providing safe sites, safe vehicles and safe drivers.”